Register Calendar New Posts
 
 
 


Reply
 
Author Comment
 
Boot

Avatar / Picture

Registered: 06/03/05
Posts: 12,356
Reply with quote  #76 
Quote:
Chapter XXV The Buffalo Camp

We had our fears for the tent; but for an hour or two it stood fast, until at length the cap gave way before a furious blast; the pole tore through the top, and in an instant we were half suffocated by the cold and dripping folds of the canvas, which fell down upon us. Seizing upon our guns, we placed them erect, in order to lift the saturated cloth above our heads. In this disagreeable situation, involved among wet blankets and buffalo robes, we spent several hours of the night during which the storm would not abate for a moment, but pelted down above our heads with merciless fury.


We've had this quote, also Arizona Rangers reference to the water collecting around the tent pole, and now the reference to the guns being strapped to the centre pole, which leads one to believe that it's a vertical pole within easy reach of the door.
All reference do tie in for a pyramid tent.
The only other tent style could be some type of bell tent.

Boot.

TheArizonaRanger

Registered: 16/12/05
Posts: 8,517
Reply with quote  #77 

It would definitely seem to indicate a single pole tent of some kind, and reading other pasages in the text relevant to people in the tent and space it would also indicate a small or compact one which leans towards the pyramid tent.

Alice

Avatar / Picture

Super Moderators
Registered: 20/11/03
Posts: 5,904
Reply with quote  #78 
How about this, from the diary of Narcissa Whitman April 1836
 
Quote:

Since we have been here we have made our tent. It is made of bedticking, in a conical form, large enough for us all to sleep under - viz.: Mr. Spalding and wife, Dr. Whitman and wife, Mr. Gray, Richard Tak-ah-too-ah-tis, and John Altz; quite a little family - raised with a centerpole and fastened down with pegs, covering a large circle. Here we shall live, eat and sleep for the summer to come, at least - perhaps longer.


Found it here
http://www.isu.edu/~trinmich/00.ar.whitman1.html 
Not a pyramid I know, but not a tipi either. Ever heard of a bed made from ticking before?
Boot

Avatar / Picture

Registered: 06/03/05
Posts: 12,356
Reply with quote  #79 
Wouldn't it keep you awake ?

Good find Alice and Mr Parkman's tent could be the same, there's been no mention of corners.

Boot.
TheArizonaRanger

Registered: 16/12/05
Posts: 8,517
Reply with quote  #80 
..  and  it takes the dating back another 10 years.
For all their simplicity maybe its not too suprising that they have been around that long.
Boot

Avatar / Picture

Registered: 06/03/05
Posts: 12,356
Reply with quote  #81 
We can't class it as a pryamid tent as it's conical.
It sounds homemade, did they design it themselves or steel it from somewhere else ?

Boot.
TheArizonaRanger

Registered: 16/12/05
Posts: 8,517
Reply with quote  #82 
Round or square, its still what you would call a pyramid design surely viewed on a level plane and from a short distance.

I have little doubt an indian seeing a pyramid for the first time would be forgiven for thinking he was looking at a stone tipi initially  ??
Alabama

Avatar / Picture

Registered: 29/08/07
Posts: 916
Reply with quote  #83 

Hey Boot, don't recall anyone else saying this, Also known as a Hunters tent. Why I'd 4got that one? Ali.

Boot

Avatar / Picture

Registered: 06/03/05
Posts: 12,356
Reply with quote  #84 
I think a lot of these names are modern thought up by the manufacturers.
I'd be interested to here if there's any period references using that name.

Weren't the pyramids in Mexico built by Indians ?

Boot.


TheArizonaRanger

Registered: 16/12/05
Posts: 8,517
Reply with quote  #85 
They were indeed Boot, but they were a different style of pyramid, step sided I believe not smooth, still pyramid shaped though I have to admit ..  and of course the Mexican Indians werent known as Indians I think, they were Aztecs, Mayans etc. very civilised by comparison to the plains tribes   and also 100's of years old even in the early to mid 1800's and I daresay my previous comment would still stand as by that time those civilisations had been all but wiped out and their cities etc long destroyed and forgotten about with it being highly unlikely that any plains indian would have seen a 'stone tipi'

It matters not what the floor plan is, round, square, many sided, viewed from the side they all have a wide base and pointed top, ..  pyramid shaped.

I agree they probably werent, called that then, and we cant prove the use of the name until we see the quote, if it exists, in Parkmans writings; Alabama says he bought one because it was called a hunters tent, but again is that merely a 'modern' name to help sell them .??
Boot

Avatar / Picture

Registered: 06/03/05
Posts: 12,356
Reply with quote  #86 
My first comment was addressing Alabama's post re' the hunters tent.

I think technically Aztec are Indians from central America, but it matters not to this debate. There is still actually more pyramids in Mexico than Eygpt.

My primary interest is with the four sided pyramid/miners tent now known as a range teepee.

Alice's source is the first reference I've seen to a conical tent, but these too are interesting if more information comes to light.

Boot.

calico_outlaw

Avatar / Picture

Registered: 27/03/07
Posts: 1,062
Reply with quote  #87 

I believe that "pyramid" tent usually refers to the fact that there was only one pole. A miner may have had canvas and used a large limb. A friend of mine does this at our gold rush events. If you can get a hold of J.G. Bruff's gold miner diary, the two volume set not the one, he has fantastic sketches. I am sure there are tent sketches there. I will look through my gold rush books and see what else I can find.

Alice

Avatar / Picture

Super Moderators
Registered: 20/11/03
Posts: 5,904
Reply with quote  #88 

 Rufus Sage's Rocky Mountain Life
Rufus Sage wandered in the Rocky Mountains from 1841 to 1843. He travelled extensively in the major fur trapping regions, and associated with trappers, traders, indians, hunters, and soldiers. He published his journal of his travels in 1846. Unlike many contemporary journalists, Sage provided detailed descriptions of the everyday activities of the "mountaineers".
 http://www.xmission.com/~drudy/mtman/html/sage/rufussage.pdf


Quote:

 
Chapter 2 Page 1

Enchairing myself upon a small log, I began to survey the surrounding objects. In the back ground stood four large Connestoga waggons, with ample canvass tops, and one dearborn, all tastefully drawn up in crescent form. To the right a small pyramid-shaped tent, with its snow-white covering, disclosed itself to the eye, and presented an air of comfort. To the left the caravan animals, securely picketed, at regular distances of some fifteen yards apart, occupied an area of several acres.

Boot

Avatar / Picture

Registered: 06/03/05
Posts: 12,356
Reply with quote  #89 
Is that a round or square pryamid ?

I'd had a tip off about that reference already.

Boot.
Linkstrap

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered: 11/03/06
Posts: 2,901
Reply with quote  #90 

Nice find Alice!

That certainly does appear to be a good solid reference to a 'pyramid shape'.

Well found!


Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

The messages featured on this board are the personal views of the poster, and as such do not represent TheShootists.co.uk
We ask that you use this board and the information within in a mature and responsible manner. Thank you.
Powered by Website Toolbox - Create a Website Forum Hosting, Guestbook Hosting, or Website Chat Room for your website.