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horseapples

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Reply with quote  #46 
The facility's still here for now, lets all damned well use it while we can.
horseapples

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Reply with quote  #47 
The NPS got back to me. No surviving examples but an ordnance dept memo from Sept 1876 Dakota Territory refers to them.
DixiePiobaire

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Reply with quote  #48 
Thanks for that HA .. at least people can be certain that they were mentioned 'in period' .. always the best evidence.

DP

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MCNELLYRANGER

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Reply with quote  #49 
H.A. do you know what was said in the memo, I'd really be interested to know. I don't think they were ever officially adopted but would be interested to know if they were tried in field trails.
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horseapples

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Reply with quote  #50 
The NPS guy didn't say but referenced an article written for a collecters magazine in 1956 buy a fella from the Smithsonian. Do you want the details?
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Reply with quote  #51 
If it's no trouble.
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Chance

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Reply with quote  #52 
From Charles Pate's excellent book on the Smith & Wesson American Model:

"Another modification of the Civil War holster should be mentioned here. On June 25, 1872, Capt. H.E. Noyes, 2nd Cavalry from Medicine Bow WT, wrote to the Ordnance Office regarding his modifications of an American Model holster to hold cartridges on the flap. (See Scott Meadows' book U.S. Military Holsters and Pistol Cartridge Boxes)  He had ten holsters modified by adding cartridge loops to the flap and an additional flap over the cartridges. He said he had used them in the field the previous two months and was having ten more modified but this time with the loops under the holster flap. Noyes modified holster was considered by the Ordnance Board of 1874, but the board did not recommend their manufacture or further test.

Various means to carry cartridges were considered by the 1872 board, including cartridge belts and "loops", strips of leather with loops for cartridges with a means to attach the strips to the saber or waist belt. For revolvers, the 1874 board recommended the use of a smaller version of the Dyer "E" carbine cartridge pouch with the elimination of its pouch for the screwdriver. But such pouches were not issued due to the great existing stock of cap pouches, and the cap pouch continued in service".  

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Reply with quote  #53 
From the above mentioned book showing cartridge loops on what appear to be "slides".

Chance

P1070507.JPG


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Django

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Reply with quote  #54 
Do you think  the measurements on the pic' are in inches Chance as there are some weird decimal points showing. Did America use fractions of inches as we do for imperial measurements in the day?

I'm assuming that the belt width is 1.85 inches ?


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Chance

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Reply with quote  #55 
Must admit I did not look at the numbers, Django. From my observations I would say that they used fractions rather than decimal measurement. Not sure when the diagram was done - could be much later, and maybe the numbers were added especially for the book, which was printed in 2006, although the type face looks like it was done with a typewriter.

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horseapples

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Reply with quote  #56 
Those slides are pictured in Packing Iron aren't they?
Boot

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Reply with quote  #57 
Those are "Hazen loops" for .45/70 ammunition they could be used with the standard saber belt as illustrated.

Those measurements are tenth of an inch.

Boot.

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tyrel

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Reply with quote  #58 
Boot do you have any pictures of you in your cavalry gear , as from the ones that where put up else where of you , your kit looked really good and i think that was LBH , i was told and some one can put me right on this , that the Prairie type belt leather and canvas loops or the all canvas narrow type carried the 45.70 rounds and the old cap pouch carried 10 Pistol rounds with 5 in the pistol . Also this type of belt was sometimes altered by saddler's to take pistol rounds on left side in altered loops . The only other Belt i can think of is the one that LaPlume makes with a looped belt , with almost like an extra set of loops fitted on. While we are talking on the subject of cavalry , can Boot help settle an argument ive had about yellow string type hat cords on the Black Campaign hats , did they or didn't they wear them during the Indian wars .  
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Boot

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Reply with quote  #59 
The yellow hat cords were part of the furniture for the 1855 Cavalry hat and later the 1858 dress hat A.K.A. "The Hardee hat" these were required to be worn when in full dress not on campaign.
That said it is quite likely that some did opt to wear them on campaign but there was no requirement to do so and it was probably the exception rater than the rule.

Boot.

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